“Camever”, A Web Capture Tool for Foscam and Amcrest Cameras

This is an “Armchair Coder” I’ve been working on this since the holidays, so today I’m releasing the beta of Camever. Camever is a webcam capture tool designed to work with most Foscam and Amcrest cameras that support the retrieval of an image from it’s snapshot.cgi in a web browser.

With a host of features including scheduling, Weather Underground Wundercam integration, image overlay, and more.  After you get done capturing a days worth of images, you can use Time Lapse Tool to put them all together into a time lapse movie.

You can read more about Camever’s features and download it from the project page.

Create timelapses with this handy tool

Last month I released the Time Lapse Tool (free and open source) which builds time lapse movies from JPG images that you provide.  Start the tool, set some options, browse to add your image files and let it do it’s thing.  Presto!  You have a time lapse movie.

Another “Armchair Coder” project, I developed TLT in Microsoft Visual C#, Time Lapse Tool is an open source application that uses the AForge.NET FFMPEG library to do most of the heavy lifting of creating the time lapse video from a user-selected list of JPG images.

Click here to read more about it and download the installer or source code.

Do Your Exchange Online Admin Tasks with PowerShell

There are some things in Exchange that you just need to use PowerShell for.  If you use Exchange Online or Office 365, the web portal exposes a lot of the admin functionality that you might need, but there are certain actions that require PowerShell.

Accessing the Exchange PowerShell cmdlets on a local server is one thing, but accessing those cmdlets in a hosted environment can be a little trickier.  After I had to type these a half-dozen times, my brain wasn’t getting it quite yet, so I build a little script that covers what you need to need to establish a connection to the remote Exchange environment.

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Stupid Windows Tricks – Taskbar Labels

I actually stumbled across this setting recently, and it reminded me of a Windows “throwback”.  It seems to simple, but I forgot that things actually used to be like this.

Somewhere along the way, probably with Windows 7, Microsoft started to try to utilize the taskbar space more efficiently.  With that, you saw the use of combined taskbar icons, meaning that if you had three separate documents opened in Word, you’d see a single Word icon in the taskbar, but see that there were icons/instances “combined” underneath it and also the text label for the icon was hidden or collapsed.  This saves screen real estate, but can make it harder to know what is open at a glance.

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